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MAGNETITE   Wheeler Mtn. Winchester, NH
4 cm specimen. Massive magnetite in granite.

Locality:          Wheeler Mtn. Winchester, NH
Specimen Size: 4 cm specimen. Massive magnetite in granite.
Field Collected: Tom Mortimer
Catalog No.:
Notes: A confirmation-voucher specimen for magnetite in the granite on the west side of the Wheeler Mtn. Ammonoosuc volcanics contact.
Highslide JS
MAGNETITE   Ham-Weeks Mine, Wakefield, NH
4 cm specimen, massive magnetite

Species:           MAGNETITE
Locality:         Ham-Weeks Mine, Wakefield, NH
Specimen Size: 4 cm specimen of massive magnetite with some orange limonite crust
Field Collected: Gene Bearss
Catalog No.: 1801
Notes: A voucher specimen for the occurrence of magnetite at the Ham-Weeks Mine.
Highslide JS
MAGNETITE   Founders Way residential construction site, Amherst, NH
4 cm specimen view with embedded 3 cm magnetite crystal

Species:           MAGNETITE
Locality:         Founders Way residential construction site, Amherst, NH
Specimen Size: 4 cm specimen view with embedded 3 cm magnetite crystal
Field Collected: Tom Mortimer (2012)
Catalog No.: 1835
Notes:
Highslide JS
MAGNETITE   Hidden Pond residential development, Amherst, NH
5.5 cm specimen with 9 mm magnetite crystals

Species:           MAGNETITE
Locality:         Hidden Pond residential development, Amherst, NH
Specimen Size: 5.5 cm specimen with 9 mm magnetite crystals
Field Collected: Tom Mortimer (2012)
Catalog No.: 1841
Notes: Photo taken in natural sunlight.
Highslide JS
MAGNETITE   Hidden Pond residential development, Amherst, NH
9 mm magnetite crystal with stepped triangular faces

Species:           MAGNETITE
Locality:         Hidden Pond residential development, Amherst, NH
Specimen Size: 9 mm magnetite crystal with stepped triangular faces
Field Collected: Tom Mortimer (2012)
Catalog No.: 1837
Notes: Photo taken in natural sunlight.
Highslide JS
MAGNETITE   Jerico Lake Dam, Berlin, NH
1.1 cm magnetite crystal in 2.8 cm specimen

Species:           MAGNETITE
Locality:         Jerico Lake Dam, Berlin, NH
Specimen Size: 1.1 cm magnetite crystal in 2.8 cm specimen
Field Collected: (Unknown) - a gift from Anna Wilken
Catalog No.: 1834
Notes: This is a natural sunlight photo. This is a little known locality.
Highslide JS
MAGNETITE    Soapstone Quarry, Richmond, NH
4 cm specimen with magnetite zones to 1.2 cm in quartz-feldspar matrix.
Species:           MAGNETITE  
Locality:          Soapstone Quarry, Richmond, NH
Specimen Size: 4 cm specimen with magnetite zones to 1.2 cm in quartz-feldspar matrix.
Field Collected: Tom Mortimer - 2006
Catalog No.: 1871
Notes: Magnetite identification by strong magnetic attraction. Magnetite has not appeared on previous Richmond Soapstone Quarry species lists.
Highslide JS
MAGNETITE in muscovite    Parker Mtn. Mine, Center Strafford, NH
2.5 mm field of view magnetite? embedded in muscovite

Species:           MAGNETITE in muscovite
Locality:          Parker Mtn. Mine, Center Strafford, NH
Specimen Size: 2.5 mm field of view magnetite? embedded in muscovite
Field Collected: Dana Morong
Catalog No.: A Dana Morong specimen
Notes: Specimen is illuminated from the rear. An illustration of magnetite inclusions in muscovite from an American Mineralogist article by Frondel & Ashby, vol. 22 (1937) pg. 106 compares very favorably to this Parker Mtn. specimen.
Highslide JS
MAGNETITE in QUARTZ    Gale River, Franconia, NH
1.4 cm specimen
Species:           MAGNETITE in Quartz  
Locality:          Gale River, Franconia, NH
Specimen Size: 1.4 cm specimen
Field Collected: Joey Vaughan
Catalog No.: 2023
Notes: The first EDS analysis suggested fayalite, the iron end member of the olivine group. Microscope examination of the specimen showed both dark glassy grains and clear glassy grains. Both the dark and clear grains were magnetic. A follow-up EDS analysis of the dark grains showed only Fe and O present, indicating magnetite. An analysis of a clear grain showed it to be just quartz. At highest magnification, the "clear" grains were observed to have tiny black inclusions, very likely magnetite. These magnetite inclusions gave the clear grains their magnetic attraction. The first analysis suggesting fayalite must have included an area of both magnetite and quartz. An acknowledgement to Peter Cristofono who noticed the tiny black inclusions in the clear grains.
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